Piotr Bein's blog = blog Piotra Beina

08/12/2014

Iconic Mideast Photo Is a Fake — and Heartbreaking One at That

Filed under: Uncategorized — grypa666 @ 09:49

Iconic Mideast Photo Is a Fake — and Heartbreaking One at That

http://theuglytruth.wordpress.com/2014/12/07/iconic-mideast-photo-is-a-fake-and-heartbreaking-one-at-that/

Staged: Ricki Rosen’s photograph meant to depict an Israeli boy and a Palestinian boy in Jerusalem has been reproduced hundreds of times.

ed note–the 1,000 times I have seen this picture scattered here and there across the net, it always aggravated me, the reason being that what it implied was that these 2 children–and by extension the 2 peoples their charactures are meant to represent–could just ‘get along, y’all’ if it weren’t for unreasonable adults on both sides running things.

What is obviously absent from this very clever subliminal propaganda is that the entire conflict–no, let’s try this again–THE ENTIRE CONFLICT–is due to one party having invaded, stole, murdered (on a mass scale) displaced, occupied, etc for over half a century. It isn’t a matter of ‘he said/she said’ where it is impossible to find out who threw the first punch and therefore who is to blame. Israel was, is and always will be the aggressor and to simply have it all boil down to some impish notion that  after all this the 2 peoples could ‘jes get along, y’all’ after all that has been done by the Jews to the Arabs is simply nonsense.

Now, of course, the ugly truth comes out, over 20 years later–THE ENTIRE SHTICK WAS STAGED, by Jews, using Jews as the ceneter stage actors/characters and done with the obvious intent of coloring the minds of those who see this in a certain way which, as I stated earlier, is meant to exculpate Israel of the millions (billions?) of war crimes she has committed against the Palestinian people.

So, the obvious question all of this begs is–HOW MANY OTHER ICONIC PICS/STATEMENTS/FACTOIDS, ETC, THAT HAVE BECOME PART OF THE LEXICON WHEN DISCUSSING ISRAEL (AND JEWISH INTERESTS IN GENERAL) ARE ALSO BOLD-FACED LIES? WILL WE FIND OUT 20 YEARS FROM NOW THAT IT WAS ALL ‘A TRICK’, THE TERM USED BY ONE FORMER KNESSET MEMBER IN DESCRIBING JEWS’ USE OF THE TERM ‘ANTI-SEMITISM’ WHEN THEY WANT TO SHUT DOWN A DISCUSSION THAT IS UNCOMFORTABLE FOR THEM?

‘By way of deception, we shall make war on the Gentile mind…’

The Jewish Forward

One week into Israel’s war with Gaza this past summer, superstar Rihanna tweeted a photo of an Israeli boy and a Palestinian boy with their arms around each other facing away from the camera: “Let’s pray for peace and a swift end to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict!” she wrote. “Is there any hope?….”

The photo was posted as damage control after the pop star tweeted — and then eight minutes later deleted — the hashtag #FreePalestine. That initial tweet provoked an immediate barrage from Israel advocates on Twitter asking if she supported Hamas. It’s not clear to what degree the photo mollified her critics. But what Rihanna didn’t know was that the photo is actually a fake.

The boys in the picture aren’t an Israeli and a Palestinian, but two Israeli Jews.

The 1993 photo, taken three months after the signing of the Oslo Accords, is one of the most iconic pictures from the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. In it, a boy in a red shirt with a yarmulke and a boy in a black shirt and a keffiyeh walk with their arms slung over each other’s shoulders. Though the background is blurry, they are clearly in the white and green environs of Jerusalem, meandering on a dirt path to an unknown destination. They appear to be lost in conversation, oblivious to the photographer behind them.

In addition to Rihanna’s tweet — which was retweeted by 46,000 people — the photograph has been reproduced hundreds of times on the Internet, appearing in the American Jewish magazine Tikkun, on the web site of the Israel advocacy groupJerusalem Institute of Justice, on various American and Israeli news sites and Facebook pages, and even on the blog belonging to Jack Kornfield, one of the most prominent Buddhists in America.

Yet unlike the other famous pictures documenting the Israeli-Palestinian conflict — such as the 1967 photo of three Israeli soldiers at the Western Wall, or the 1993 shot of Yasser Arafat and Yitzhak Rabin shaking hands on the White House lawn — the photo of the two boys is purely allegorical. With their backs to the camera, the boys are anonymous stand-ins for all Israelis and Palestinians. Set against the backdrop of one of the oldest cities on earth, the picture has a timeless quality. It’s a depiction of what might have been, and what could be in the future, in spite of today’s moribund peace process.

It’s also completely staged.

“I think I felt awkward about it,” said the boy in the yarmulke, speaking now some 21 years later as an adult.

All Grown Up: Zvi Shapiro (left), now 32, wore the kippah in the famous photo. Zemer Aloni (right), now 33, wore the keffiyeh.

The Israeli boy in the yarmulke is Zvi Shapiro, the son of two secular American-Israelis. The Palestinian boy is Zemer Aloni, an Israeli Jew. The only real aspect of the photo is that the boys were indeed friends and that the picture was taken in their Jerusalem neighborhood of Abu Tor, which straddles the 1949 armistice line and contains both a Jewish and an Arab section. The boys grew up on the Jewish side of the neighborhood, and while they both recall interactions with Palestinians, neither counted close friends on the other side of the line.

The picture was taken by Ricki Rosen, an American photojournalist who has been covering the Israeli-Palestinian conflict for 26 years. Rosen snapped the photo on assignment for Maclean’s, the national news magazine of Canada, for a cover story about the Oslo Peace Accords. Rosen said that the magazine’s art director was so specific in what he wanted that he even drew her a picture — one boy in a yarmulke, the other in a keffiyeh shot from the back walking down a long road, which was supposed to symbolize the road to peace. He didn’t care whether the boys were actually Israelis or Palestinians, nor did it occur to him that the Palestinian’s keffiyeh would be styled in a way more typical for elderly Palestinian men than for young boys.

“It was a symbolic illustration,” said Rosen. “It was never supposed to be a documentary photo.” She also took other real-life photos for the same article.

Rosen, who also lived in Abu Tor, asked her neighbor Haim Shapiro, then a reporter for the Jerusalem Post, if he would be willing to volunteer his young son for the Jewish boy in the assignment. “If there was any place to find a Palestinian kid who would agree to do this, it would have been Abu Tor,” said Rosen. “But I didn’t look because I thought it would be a very difficult thing. The relations had completely broken down after the first intifada, and Palestinians were very fearful of being seen as collaborating with Israelis because collaborators were being killed.” Instead, Zvi Shapiro’s best friend Zemer Aloni, who lived a block away, would wear the keffiyeh. Aloni said that the fact that he has “Eastern roots” — his father is an Iranian Jew — made him an appropriate choice for the job.

On the day of the shoot, Rosen brought a keffiyeh that she used to leave on her dashboard on reporting trips to the West Bank during the first intifada — a safeguard against her vehicle being pelted by stones and Molotov cocktails — and dressed 12-year-old Aloni in it. Zvi Shapiro, then 11, donned a yarmulke, and the two went for a walk on the nearby Sherover Promenade.

“Ricki told us to just talk to each other,” said Shaprio. “It’s also funny because I don’t think we would have necessarily put our arms around each other the way we are.” Rosen shot several images of the pair that day, including one from the front that is rarely reproduced.

Keen Eye: Ricki Rosen has been photographing the Israeli-Palestinian conflict for 26 years.

In 2002, the photo was digitized as part of Rosen’s collection on Corbis Images, a Seattle-based company that manages licensing for editorial and creative photographs. On the Corbis web site, there is no indication that the photograph is fake; it is categorized as a stock image under “News.” Yet even though the photo is copyrighted, the vast majority of the reproductions online — Rihanna’s included — have occurred without Rosen’s or Corbis’s knowledge or permission. On some sites, such as that of Tikkun, the photograph is credited as Creative Commons, meaning anyone can use it — a categorization to which Rosen never agreed. Without control over where the image appears, Rosen said, she is unable to explain to those who would use it that the photo is staged. Nor has she been properly compensated for her work.

It wasn’t until after Rihanna tweeted the photo and Zvi Shapiro’s mother brought it to Rosen’s attention that she realized how many people were posting the image without her consent. She said that Corbis is looking into Rihanna’s usage on her behalf. If Rosen is not financially compensated, she said. “I want her to retweet it with my credit and say, ‘I am sorry for stealing the intellectual property of another artist.’” She would also like Rihanna to explain that the photo isn’t really of a Palestinian and an Israeli kid, but is meant to represent “the hopes then for peace down the road.”

After the photo shoot, Shapiro and Aloni remained close friends for a few years but began to drift apart in middle school. Shapiro said that the last time he saw Aloni was when they were both in the army and they ran into each other at a coffee shop, a meeting Aloni did not recall. Shapiro, now 32, said that his experience in the army — he was stationed in Jerusalem during the Palestinian suicide bombing campaign in the second intifada — left him wanting to go to a “place that was the least like Israel as I could find.” Rather than travel to India or South America, like many Israelis do after the army, he enrolled in Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine. He is now completing a doctoral program in child clinical psychology at Pennsylvania State University. Married to a woman who does not speak Hebrew, he does not know if or when he will return to Israel.

After Aloni’s army service, he was trained as an architect at Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design in Jerusalem. Now 33, he is working as an architect in Nahalal, near Haifa, where he lives with his wife. Aloni said that looking back on the photo, he had no qualms about appearing as a Palestinian. “I don’t see Arabs as the enemy,” he said. “If someone told me I looked like an Arab, I wouldn’t care. It’s not something to be ashamed of.” When asked whether some Palestinians might consider the outfit degrading — akin to blackface in America — he said he had never considered the issue in that light. “America is much more politically correct about stuff than here.”

Shapiro, on the other hand, said that the racial aspect of the photo now strikes him as “really, really strange.”

“I think it’s probably less acceptable today than it was then,” he said. Because he’s not religious, he also felt like a bit of an imposter wearing a yarmulke. “It’s really not me in the picture, but it’s even less him,” he said of Aloni.

“One of the things I feel about it is just kind of sad,” said Shapiro. “There was a brief period where it didn’t seem as far-fetched as it does now. And it could have just been my naivete as a child, but I felt it almost symbolizes something that we have lost and that I hope we can regain. I think there is a genuine belief that if there is a peaceful solution there can be not only peace but camaraderie and real friendship.”

Aloni called the image a “wishful thinking picture.” He added, “Then it was almost a reality, and now it is like a vision.”

  1. #1 by organizedcrimedotgov on December 7, 2014 – 11:04 pm

    It wasn’t until after Rihanna tweeted the photo and Zvi Shapiro’s mother brought it to Rosen’s attention that she realized how many people were posting the image without her consent. She said that Corbis is looking into Rihanna’s usage on her behalf. If Rosen is not financially compensated, she said. “I want her to retweet it with my credit and say, ‘I am sorry for stealing the intellectual property of another artist.’” She would also like Rihanna to explain that the photo isn’t really of a Palestinian and an Israeli kid, but is meant to represent “the hopes then for peace down the road.”

    Aha! There it is, the money aspect.

    News flash, ALL “intellectual property” in the universe belongs to God.

    Rosen said that the magazine’s art director was so specific in what he wanted that he even drew her a picture — one boy in a yarmulke, the other in a keffiyeh shot from the back walking down a long road, which was supposed to symbolize the road to peace. He didn’t care whether the boys were actually Israelis or Palestinians

    Yeah, they wanted to portray this in a certain way, they could benefit from.

    Unfortunately, critical thinking is a skill that has been bred out of the general population… that’s one of the reasons they can move and act with impunity knowing they are virtually immune to repercussions.

  2. #2 by Konrad on December 7, 2014 – 11:06 pm

    [1] MG asks, “How many other iconic pics/statements/factoids, etc, that have become part of the lexicon when discussing Israel (and Jewish interests in general) are also bold-faced lies?”

    Bold faced lies? How about the “holocaust”? How about ninety five percent of the things that average people have been told about World War II? How about the bombing of Pan Am flight 103? (21 Dec 1988) and the bombing of the Israeli embassy in Buenos Aires (17 March 1992), and the Israeli embassy in London (26 July 1994), and the AMIA building in Buenos Aires (18 July 1994)? How about the bombing of the US embassies in Kenya and Tanzania (7 Aug 1998) and the attack on the USS Cole (12 Oct 2000)? How about 9-11? How about the Madrid train bombing (11 March 2004) and London subway bombings (7 July and 21 July 2005)?

    Those are just a few events that immediately come to mind. The Jews did all these, some by themselves, and some with the cooperation of western intelligence agencies.

    The USA continues to worship Jews even when a false flag fails, and the Jews are exposed (e.g. the attack on the USS Liberty).

    That’s why I say that Jonathan Pollard, for example, got thirty years because he stepped on the wrong Jewish toes. It was Jews that wanted Pollard in prison. If Pollard had only hurt Goyim, he would have had no problems.

    [2] MG makes a good point; one that I am always making, namely that Jews, politicians, the corporate media, and most people treat all Jewish atrocities as a conflict between equals.

    During the most recent bombardment of Gaza, Jews watched the slaughter from nearby hilltops, applauding every time an explosion went off. It was a “conflict between equals.” On 17 July 2014, CNN reporter Diana Magnay saw this and was disgusted. When she expressed her dismay to the Jews on one hilltop, they threatened to destroy her car. When she secretly tweeted that the Jewish spectators were “scum,” CNN fired her, but when Ms. Magnay said she “deeply regretted” what she had said, CNN reassigned her to Moscow. That same day, NBC pulled their journalist Ayman Mohyeldin out of Gaza, and replaced him with a militant Jew named Richard Engle. Mohyeldin’s reports were far too honest and powerful for the Jews to tolerate.

    [3] The “Forward” says the boys in the picture aren’t an Israeli and a Palestinian, but two Israeli Jews.

    The Internet images of “Hamas terrorists” with their “rockets” are also Jews. That’s why their faces are always covered up with balaclavas (aka ski masks).

  3. #3 by Edward on December 8, 2014 – 1:52 am

    Everything that comes out of that tribe is just outright evil. Even this photo.

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